Select Page
Benefits of Managed IT Services For Your Business

Benefits of Managed IT Services For Your Business

Is IT at the heart of your company?

Imagine your company is a heart, and managed IT services provide the health benefits to sustain your entire business system. You do the work you love, and your customers, your employees, and your products keep the beat. Technology is the energy that feeds each beat, helping you keep your rhythm. On that note, let’s look at the top benefits of managed IT services and how outsourcing some of your technology infrastructure can bring new value to your business.

Benefits of managed IT services for IT networks

Attention from an IT managed services provider gives you freedom.

If you’re a small business owner, you might have core people wearing the hats of IT, without the time or resources to fully engage new technology. Whenever you supplement your internal resources with external IT consulting experts, you open up time to focus on what you do best. Likewise, you free your people, meaning they’ll have more time for creativity and thought leadership in your organization. By freeing your core team from the responsibilities attached to the fast-changing complexities of technology, you ensure focus on your products, your processes, and your customer service.

 

Risk management, as a central feature of IT solutions, ensures uptime.

Straightaway, one of the top benefits of managed IT services is that you don’t have to worry about your backups. Similarly, your cybersecurity infrastructure and your compliance adherence is always at its best. As a result, you experience more uptime. Less time is lost to researching the latest security software or the most recent regulations affecting your industry. Moreover, a managed services provider (MSP) provides a solid risk management plan:

  • Data management, including backup solutions and backup testing
  • Network care, including network administration and security
  • Systems and software support, including 24/7 incident response monitoring and assistance
  • User training and testing capabilities, including penetration testing and real-time analytics
  • Audit and assessment management, including planning and scheduling

Supporting in-house talent with out-house IT skillsets

You wouldn’t want to ask your employees to beat your heart for you. Many companies find themselves in this sort of “CPR for IT” scenario. A break-fix methodology might work for a glitch in your network. However, more robust attacks can quickly sap the life from your core.

 

Sooner or later, you’ll find yourself in a situation that needs a more heroic save. Eventually, an aging server or a spear phishing attack will make you consider outsourcing some of the more difficult technology management. Whether you’re looking at cybersecurity or private cloud hosting, a good MSP doesn’t only provide a mere lifeline for your business. Rather, a managed services provider should prevent attacks and disruption.

 

Partnership with proven IT consultants and solutions gives you predictable costs in a scalable and adaptable framework.

Why choose an outsourced IT service? An information technology scramble can feel similar to a panic attack. If you fall behind on patches or updates, either on the software side or the hardware end of things, you open yourself up to ever-evolving threats. One of the great benefits of managed IT services is lower risk, and this means increased stability for your IT budget. Furthermore, you can know your investment brings your business the top solutions available to your industry.

 

Your partnership with a consulting firm of technology experts gives you talent aligned with your unique needs. Service level agreements define the relationship and the commitment. An MSP partnership acts as your metronome, meaning your technology is predictable and always set at the pace you’d like to keep.

 

Advanced technology means the sky’s the limit for business growth and success.

If your heart’s wish is to be a Boeing or a Lockheed Martin but you only have 100 employees to set your pace, rather than 100,000+, then partnering with an MSP levels the playing field by integrating advanced technology early in your game.

 

Why not implement advanced IT solutions in-house?

Malware is the tip of the spear in cyberthreat management, and compliance goes far beyond CMMC or HIPAA.  MSP consultants let you focus on core business initiatives, while your outsourced resources reduce risk at lower monthly costs than if you’d solo the challenge. Especially if you’re caught in a cycle of break-fix services, you know how unpredictable technology can be, and managed services takes all the worry out of IT.

 

An MSP opens your doors to highly qualified, certified and experienced IT technicians, engineers and architects. In the end, your managed services provider holds the responsibility of keeping your technology competitive and secure. New solutions can be implemented while you’re thinking about future products and new customers.

 

With cloud solutions on the rise, you can stay above the storm by utilizing a team specifically trained for virtualization. You can work in Loveland, Colorado (home to the EstesGroup headquarters), or you can work from any airport or hotel or office building in the nation.

Benefits of managed services for cloud solutions

Advanced persistent threats are moving businesses into the secure lining of cloud technology. Moreover, the cloud provides the most economical long-term infrastructure to scale your business. New challenges to data management surface daily. Cloud services prevent revenue loss by keeping you up-to-date and secure. Cloud-based IT circumvents natural disasters and human errors. Across systems and devices, your backups and your real-time data are secured against ransomware and other malicious attacks. This is especially true when considering complex cloud ERP architecture.

 

Due to complex sync and share capabilities, workers are empowered through remote enablement, including virtual office deployment. As a result, your business is keeping pace with new, mobile technology. Meanwhile, your sensitive information and valuable business assets (the heart of your business) are secured by SECaaS (security as a service) in the cloud. Remote monitoring keeps track of your hardware and software for you. With telemedicine on the rise, a managed services company enables privacy protection that exceeds regulations like HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability). Unquestionably, the cloud makes compliance cost effective, and your in-house IT team is free from monitoring new governance and regulation.

 

EstesGroup tailors managed IT services through solutions that meet everything from basic needs to advanced requirements (including, but not limited to, Microsoft, US Signal, Datto, SentinalOne, ThreatLocker, and Acronis). In addition, our EstesCloud managed services provide private cloud hosting to support advanced IT needs, and we call our hosting platform ECHO. Our co-located data centers protect sensitive data. Our IT services division is headquartered in Loveland, Colorado, but we have happy clients throughout the nation. Please ask to speak to them. EstesGroup also leverages the benefits of managed IT solutions with enterprise resource planning.

 

 

How to Stop Social Engineering Attacks

How to Stop Social Engineering Attacks

Cybersecurity in the Ballot Box, the Bistro and the Bedroom

October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, a time when organizations across America join together to educate the public about cyberthreats like social engineering (especially phishing attacks). This year, it’s also the last full month to decide your vote for the 2020 election. As citizens consider the future of our country, we see the tech giants coming together to prevent election crime, while tech users struggle to keep up with device security. With online fraud on the rise, how do you know your business is protected from a cyberattack, especially when considering advanced techniques like social engineering?

 

How to stop social engineering attacks with access, login, passwords, security
Digital integrity continues to drive decisions in both the public and private sectors. Your online presence creates data that can be used to influence you. How many times have you seen an ad in your web browser and thought, “How in the world!? I was just thinking about that!” Because everything we do online can be tracked, documented, exchanged, and sold, we need to be aware of the risks. However, there’s no need to fear for your online safety. Our security consultants can quickly scan the dark web to see if your data is in the wrong hands.

 

National Cybersecurity Month comes to us from organizations that promote assertiveness, rather than paranoia. We don’t have to be afraid of our connectivity or our devices. On the contrary, we need to embrace them holistically and attentively (and with a little help from the cybersecurity experts).

 

How to stop social engineering attacks at work and at home

Do Your Part. #BeCyberSmart.

 

Home Connectivity: This week’s cybersecurity awareness theme is “Securing Devices at Home and Work.” When reviewing the year, did you spend time working from home? Did you have children suddenly in Zoom classes, rather than in a traditional classroom? Did you have the resources you need (virus, malware, and ransomware protection) to stay safe online?

 

Business Technology: Your business couldn’t operate without digital interactions with devices outside of your office walls. Furthermore, your business can’t operate without a dedicated plan for protecting employee and customer data. How do hackers get into your system? Common external penetration methods include baiting, phishing, and spear phishing.

 

Baiting: Curiosity killed the network

 

First of all, baiting attacks can begin with hardware or with software. For example, a hacker can leave a corrupted flash drive on your desk, and the attack begins with the physical action of a user plugging it into a laptop and then clicking through files that install malware throughout the system. How to stop this social engineering technique from attacking your business begins with employee cybersecurity awareness training.

 

October is a perfect month for bringing in external cybersecurity resources to help bolster your team. To begin, we can provide system assessments that surface hacker access points. Then, our engineers can test your users. For example, our security technicians can engineer a scareware drill to make users think they’re clicking to patch, when really they’re getting tricked into a click. If your employees understand the various forms of baiting, then you can prevent a data breach.

 

Phishing: The one that got away

 

Did you ever see a prompt to “click here” or “download now” from an email that was obviously fake? In the past, phishing emails were more obvious. A strange font or a missing signature was clue enough. Unfortunately, advanced social engineering technology now lets a cybercriminal twin a real user’s software behaviors.

 

Because phishing is the most common social engineering tactic, NIST recently developed the Phish Scale, a cybersecurity tool that helps businesses surface network vulnerabilities by assessing cues, click rates, and user interactions in regard to phishing email difficulty levels. This new method of testing phishing attempts assists cybersecurity experts by evaluating spoofed emails through advanced data analysis. CIOs, CISOs, and other technology experts can use this tool to optimize phishing awareness and training programs.

 

Spear Phishing: In IT together

 

Often, a phishing email comes to your inbox addressed specifically to you but without personal information as part of its composition. Therefore, signs of imitation are more easily observed. “Click to download” prompts hesitancy if the email comes with a generic invitation. 

 

When an email comes through with more personalized data, like a personal email signature or an attached thread of coworkers, it can trick you into thinking the sender is legit. In this case, a hacker follows the digital footprints of a user and engineers that data to create a personalized phishing attack. Think of this as the Shakespeare of social engineering, and the play is written for you and with you as the inspiration. 

 

When organizations create security strategies in an effort to prevent social engineering attacks, phishing prevention is always a sign of a thorough plan. When considering phishing emails, keep in mind that malware can stay undetected in a system for months before the IT department discovers the penetration. Spear phishing can prompt a sly malware that quickly infects an entire network.

 

Vote to Stop Cybercrime

 

At EstesGroup, we know how to stop social engineering attacks from harming your business. Furthermore, we know how to take the worry out of IT. Protecting everything from saved credentials to individual clicks, our cybersecurity experts defend your business while you do the work you love. Do your coworkers need practice in recognizing the fraudulent behaviors fueling social engineering attacks? October is a perfect month to initiate new security policies and procedures, and to test your cybersecurity plan.

 

EstesGroup is a 2020 National Cybersecurity Awareness Month Champion. Please join us for a webinar on the most advanced cloud solutions available to businesses. Read more about National Cybersecurity Month at the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA) or at the Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA).

 

Private Cloud Solutions For Businesses Webinar
Social Engineering Techniques: How Hackers Come Home

Social Engineering Techniques: How Hackers Come Home

Time to Learn Social Engineering Techniques

 

WELCOME HOME, MALWARE

TIME TO MAKE YOURSELF AT HOME

 

Human manipulation fuels social engineering techniques, and basic security measures, like anti-virus software, often can’t prevent innocent behaviors, like trust, from compromising your data. Hackers frequently penetrate corporate networks because employees open the door. Necessary to break the trust-manipulation cycle, advanced security solutions can detect, and even predict, social actions that lead to system infiltration. Advanced attacks that use subtle social engineering techniques often come and go without a trace, so how do you prevent sophisticated attackers from making themselves at home in your business?

 

A hacker’s “Welcome Home” sign might be on an open Wi-Fi network, or it might be on your personal computer, or even your phone. A social engineering attack taps into your life in a way that can feel “like home” to you. Soon, the person you trust takes over your “house” of data, and this can be at both home-life and corporate-life levels, at the same moment, since you might integrate work and home through the use of your mobile phone, laptop, smart watch, tablet (maybe even through a Wi-Fi enabled coffeemaker).

 

If you leave your doors unlocked, people might crash in your digital living room even while your computer is sleeping. If you have dozens or hundreds of employees, each human presents at least one door to your data. Multiply this by the average number of devices employees utilize for work optimization (desktops, laptops, mobile phones, tablets, smart televisions), and you’ll see that your business has hundreds of thousands of access points.

 

Businesses naturally have an “open door” culture. You want new clients. You want good growth and reputation to result from your offerings, and this means you have to interact with strangers on a daily basis. Stranger danger? Not if that stranger has the potential to become a favorite customer. This is why it’s critical to understand the nuances of social engineering techniques (or partner with a managed IT team that does).

 

Because companies leave their virtual doors open, they attract attacks that utilize simple social engineering strategies (no hacking genius required). Detecting these nefarious online behaviors often takes advanced cyber analytics, and preventing data breaches begins with training based on what is known about these cyberattack strategies.

 

Here are 3 ways hackers let themselves in and make themselves at home in your network:

 

 

Phishing

 

32% of security breaches begin with phishing attacks. If someone knows your email address, then you can receive a phishing email. How do you prevent these attacks when you’re a business owner constantly giving your email address to strangers? If you do any of the following behaviors, you’re at increased risk of a phishing attack:

  • You exchange business cards at conferences, trade shows and other social gatherings.
  • You publish your contact information on your website or on online social networking pages.
  • You use email to communicate with your employees, partners, customers and potential clients.
  • You respond to emails quickly, often overlooking small details in the delivery structure.

 

Exchanging

 

Save money. Save time. Download free software. Fill in a form or upload your business card and get free information. The bliss of the internet is free exchange. You can hop from one website to another, learning for free and networking for free, all from the comfort of your sofa, saving time and travel expense. Sadly, the risk of “free” malware comes with every exchange that happens in our connected online world. If you do any of the following online activities, you’re at increased risk of a social engineering attack:

  • You skip the fine print and click the download button before reviewing terms, agreements and privacy policies.
  • You see a website you like with content you want, so you freely give your name, address, phone number, and maybe even your employment information, in exchange for a download.
  • You download free apps and sign up for free trials.

 

Spying

 

Hackers often look over your shoulder to get the information they need to access your data. You might be at a coffeeshop talking to a friend while your unlocked phone sits cup-side. Maybe your phone is also on open Wi-Fi, leaving multiple open doors into your private life. E-espionage often happens at the places you love — your favorite deli, your downtown square — tranquil places, where you don’t feel a sense of vigilance. You are at risk of becoming a social engineering attack victim if you do any of the following activities:

  • You leave your laptop, phone, or tablet on the table when you see your friend in line at the coffeehouse and get up to say hello.
  • You turn password access off on your phone so that you don’t have to unlock it later.
  • You use public Wi-Fi networks.
  • You have the same password for multiple accounts so that you’ll always remember your login credentials.

 

If you got through these lists without a hitch, then you’ve taken the right steps to prevent social engineering techniques from ruining your life with ransomware. Unfortunately, the hackers could still carry you over your own threshold. Why? Because as soon as you add coworkers or friends to your contact list, and as soon as you begin to communicate using your devices, you introduce new risks.

 

Supply Chain Cybersecurity
EternalBlue Hacks & Tales from the Unpatched (Video)

EternalBlue Hacks & Tales from the Unpatched (Video)

EternalBlue Hacking Tools

EternalBlue, which is an ancient set of hacks — ancient: going back three years — is still applicable, especially in regard to some of the technology and vulnerabilities that we are seeing today. EternalBlue is a software that the NSA developed to hack Windows machines. The goal was to break into a computer (without telling the owner “someone’s there”) — and then run a software of choice. Windows contains more than two millions lines of code, so nobody, even at Microsoft, really knows what it’s all doing, and vulnerabilities are found every day. EternalBlue hacks targeted some of those vulnerabilities.

Running Windows makes you vulnerable by default. Linux, Mac, Android, iPhone — they’re all vulnerable because we’ve reached the state of complexity in the operating systems that we choose to run that it’s just a matter of time before new ways are found to break into these systems. Online trickery happens, and people download malware thinking they’re getting a good piece of software. For example, there was once a program called Whack-a-Mole. It was known to have a Trojan in it, so if hackers were able to convince you “hey, this is the coolest game in town,” then your machine would be infected. When hackers are trying to break into a machine, whether through a means like Whack-a-Mole or through an EternalBlue hack, they’re trying to do it surreptitiously, invisibly. They don’t want you to know because, if you knew, you might do something like reboot. This led the hackers to ratchet up what we call the “persistence” of malware, so that maybe it could survive a reboot.

If you’ve ever had a browser toolbar appear in Internet Explorer, or Chrome or Firefox or Edge, or any other browser, that toolbar probably has the rights to see wherever you’re surfing and modify the webpages that you get back, and can even interact with you. A toolbar is a very visual indicator that “you’ve been hacked.” Is that toolbar interested in stealing your passwords and learning your PayPal login and modifying what you visit and how you see it? Maybe, maybe not. But it’s an indication that you’re running untrusted software. Going out to the web and downloading a piece of software because it looks interesting is almost a guaranteed way to get hacked.

 

EternalBlue Hacker

 

WannaCry

 

Malware programmers write apps, publish them and they get downloaded, and in the background there’s a malware stealing passwords, modifying webpages, looking at your identity — those are all activities I would consider hacks — and that’s what EternalBlue is. In short, it leverages a vulnerability that the NSA found in the Microsoft SMB protocol. They found that if they hurled a packet that was the right size in the right shape, it would shove a square peg into a round hole, and the round hole wouldn’t know what to do, and so it would execute a buffer overflow attack. Windows wasn’t expecting a square peg in a round hole, so it would trip, fall down, and execute code of the attacker’s choice. EternalBlue hacks took advantage of a “round” Server Message Block (SMB) hole, and as that SMB failed, it could run a Trojan, or blue screen a computer, or download a piece of malware.

 

Less than thirty days after EternalBlue got into the hands of cybercriminals, a nasty bug called WannaCry was released to the world. It made you want to cry because it was ransomware. It used EternalBlue as the delivery exploit, so as soon as WannaCry got a foothold inside a corporate network, it would jump from machine to machine to machine and ransom. By the next year, EternalBlue hacks had cost companies and industries billions of dollars, and 65 countries have fallen to EternalBlue’s vulnerability and have been ransomed or hacked in some fashion. Why? Because even after Microsoft released a patch, millions of computers were unprotected because people didn’t patch.

 

 

Patching… and more than patching

 

Cybercriminals are continually waiting for time, opportunity, and tools to be able to successfully hack into your system. To prevent it, we do a number of things. We patch our machines, we turn on our firewalls, and we don’t let people be local administrators. We make sure our antivirus is current. But we need more than antivirus because hackers now have toolkits to program custom malware. They don’t have to know about EternalBlue hacks if they have a malware toolkit. These toolkits change malware by a byte or two bytes, which changes the signature of the program. As a result, the antivirus software, which is looking for signatures, can’t detect the malware. This designer malware is specifically written for a particular company. The malware is one-of-a-kind and still does the same EternalBlue exploit. Because of this dark web exchange of malware toolkits and designer ransomware, more robust cybersecurity measures, like endpoint security, are needed to keep our businesses safe.

 

IF Only Tech Time

Fridays – Noon (MT)

Answers to all things about IT

IF you did miss IT… did you miss IT!? No worries! 

Watch a tech talk here!

Dark Web Protection: Assessment, Awareness & Actualization

Dark Web Protection: Assessment, Awareness & Actualization

Deep Web

Business owners, especially those who have been through the challenges involved in a data breach, often hope the dark web goes completely dark — as in nonexistent. Wouldn’t it be nice if trending IT services, like advanced web scans and security audits, go out with the times? For now, the illegal realm of the dark web makes history every day, so companies must work nonstop to predict cyber threats and stay a step ahead of the hackers.

 

Dark Exposure

 

The dark web is an encrypted network of criminal intent. The deep web, conversely, provides a safe haven for your private information. By law, you need to keep most of your business data hidden from public view. You don’t want your financial information or your employees’ social security numbers exposed, and neither does the government. Whether you’re a manufacturing company in the heart of Denver, Colorado, or a distribution business with hubs across the country, you need hidden security — call it “dark web” protection — for massive amounts of corporate data. This means you’ll need to keep your real-time data and your backups in the deep web and out of the dark web.

 

The deep web is essential to privacy, compliance, safety and security. Like the illegal areas of the web, it’s built from non-indexed pages. Your company’s network is not revealed to random viewers because it’s kept hidden in the deep web — unless you suffer a data breach that exposes your information to malcontents.

 

 

To Breach Their Own

 

People feel vulnerable online and are somewhat aware that cyber danger is lurking. However, data breaches often originate in too much trust or in lack of communication surrounding network trust issues. Your users trust an email and get phished, or they trust “12345” as a solid password. Could the problem be that your users trust the company to protect them? Does your team assume that strong security solutions are already in place? Here are some of the common reasons, stemming from the trust factor, that your business could suffer cyber attacks:

  • spam email
  • weak passwords
  • unprotected mobile devices
  • delayed software updates

Mix these with user oblivion (or trust) and flimsy (or outdated) policies, and your company is at high risk for a cyber attack.

 

 

“A” for Security

 

Let’s now look at 3 “Easy A” ways you can create safe deep web data:

  • Assessment: A security audit is an excellent way to surface your network’s weak points. You can immediately see vulnerabilities and close openings that could bring in hacker traffic.
  • Awareness: Users often trust the system. Cybersecurity awareness training, such as a fire drill phishing attack, can educate users about current cyber risks and prepare them for real-time attacks.
  • Actualization: Enriching and enforcing security policies, updating hardware and software, advancing network protection measures — there are hundreds of ways to make advanced security a reality for your company.

 

When was the last time you had a security audit? Have you ever clicked on a suspicious link because of mental fatigue or, the opposite, heightened curiosity? When did you last test your backups? Install updates? Scan the dark web for your private data? Did you ever turn off multi-factor authentication because it was annoying? If you assess your system and close obvious gaps, train the users accessing your corporate network, and actualize things like security in the cloud and advanced endpoint security, you can leave the hacker chapter out of your company’s history books.

 

 

 

Are you ready to protect your business from the hackers?

Our team can help you with assessment, awareness and actualization.

 

Getting QWERTY with Password Management

Getting QWERTY with Password Management

Before the Time Runs Out!

Day(s)

:

Hour(s)

:

Minute(s)

:

Second(s)

Riddle Me This, Dear Reader,

What Do These Little Threads Share?

qwerty

password

12345

iloveyou

111111

54321

I’ll tell you in a minute. A secret. A code. A…  12345. Uh… password.

 

I’m lucky to work with a team of password management rockstars because I’m about as QWERTY as it gets when it comes to password history. One of my network admins once scolded me for choosing “password” to access a vulnerable system, and I’ve depended on multi-factor authentication and other cybersecurity tricks ever since. If you’re shaking your head at me over my password management talents, then let’s take a quick look at the most common passwords of 2018: 123456, password, 123456789, 12345, 111111, 1234567, sunshine, qwerty, iloveyou.

 

 

Security

iloveyou2

 

Password proliferation has become the norm. With every new app, website and device that we commandeer, there’s new access information created. Moreover, many of these systems require a periodic reset. Keeping track of all of these passcodes can be likened to taking a mnemonic census of an anthill.

 

Archimedes once said that if only he had a solid rock on which to stand, he would move the earth.

 

If you assume that your passwords are a firm footing, prepare to have your assumptions rocked. It is believed that up to 80% of common hacking activities are due to compromised credentials, mostly in the form of stolen usernames and passwords. Worse still, IT Managers report 73% of all passwords used are duplicated in multiple applications.

 

When people use the same password for multiple systems, having one password exposed may compromise the whole network of applications. Luckily, password management doesn’t mean you have to buy a walk-in safe to store your password diaries. To keep it simple, here are a few tips to memorize as a starting point for improved password management:

  • Never use the same password twice
  • Never write down your passwords
  • Never share your passwords with anyone else
  • Never use real words or known information about yourself in your passwords
  • Avoid commonly used passwords

 

The last bullet is especially salient—50% of all attacks involve the top 25 most used passwords, proving there are risks involved in “getting qwerty” with your password management procedures.

 

 

Need a more sophisticated password management plan?

Shield

Let’s talk password management solutions and multi-factor authentication, two great ways to prevent getting hacked.

 

Password Manager: A password manager solution, such as SolarWinds’s PassPortal, allows you to store all of your passwords in one place. This makes managing and remembering all of them much easier. Make sure your password manager solution is itself password protected, preferably with multi-factor authentication.

 

Multi-factor authentication: Multi-factor authentication is the use of additional forms of authentication in conjunction with a traditional password. This most often takes the form of a shared key, sent to a separate device, or calculated through a common authentication application. This makes it difficult for a compromised password to compromise the application. Enable multi-factor authentication wherever possible, but make sure your secondary authentication source is equally secured with a strong password—failure to do so is like having a biplane write your shared key in the sky.

 

qwertyiloveyou2!

 

Random password generators can also help create passwords, but the results are often long random jumbles of characters and quite difficult to remember. Unless you can recite the longest word in the world from memory, you might want to use these password management tools in conjunction with a password management solution.

 

If you’re a business owner trusting dozens or hundreds or thousands of employees with sensitive information, then a managed IT solution that includes password management will definitely be the safest way to interact with the millions of letters, numbers and characters that are involved in the multitude of passwords that access the data of your systems.

 

 

Looking for help keeping your business safe from cybercrime?

Sign up for IT news sent right to your inbox, no qwerty-strings attached.